Helping Workers Throughout Wisconsin For Over 30 Years.

Each day, roughly 2,000 people ithroughout the United States experience an eye injury at work. Of those who are injured, up to 20% will lose their vision either temporarily or permanently. Furthermore, about 10% of those who experience eye injuries at work will need to take time off to recover from them. Exposure to flying objects such as sparks or bits of metal are among the hazards that can be present in a Wisconsin work area.

In many cases, employers can mitigate these and other hazards by providing adequate eye protection. For instance, those who are welding will ideally wear a welding hood. Individuals might also benefit from wearing goggles or glasses even if they are just passing through an area where debris may at risk of flying through the air. Employers should ensure that equipment is made from materials that are designed to offer the most protection.

For example, goggles that have glass lenses are less likely to scratch or get chipped. Glasses with plastic lenses tend to be lighter and less likely to fog up when a worker is welding or working in humid environments. Companies can also prevent eye injuries by inspecting a work area for hazards before workers perform any tasks. Taking steps such as adding screens or using machine guarding tools can also help to minimize the risk of an eye injury.

Those who incur eye or other workplace injuries may be entitled to workers’ compensation benefits. They may also be entitled to other forms of compensation if the injury was the result of gross negligence on the part of an employer. An attorney may be able to help an individual take steps to show that an injury occurred at work and caused financial losses.